call us on: 0114 232 9010

email us: enquiries@yewlandsacademy.org

find us: Creswick Lane, Sheffield, S35 8NN

Skip navigation

Physical Difficulties - Support Strategies

Physical Difficulties - Support Strategies

Cerebral Palsy
You may need to:

• organise physical access to different parts of the school

• liaise on a regular basis with the relevant professionals

• ensure that appropriate adult support is provided

• make use of ICT as an aid to learning

• make use of audio-visual aids

• ensure that extra time is given for specific tasks

• adapt physical activities, especially PE

• use circle time to discuss inclusion issues for all the children in the class

• celebrate ability, not disability - some children may be very able in a specific area.

Cystic Fibrosis
You may need to:

• make provision for daily physiotherapy in a quiet room with a dedicated teaching assistant who has been appropriately trained. Nebuliser treatment may also be necessary. The number of physiotherapy sessions that take place each day varies according to the child's current state of health. The length of each session will vary from 15 minutes to an hour

• ensure that special supplements are taken with all meals and snacks. These come in capsule form and need to be taken in large quantities

• provide work for the child to do at home or liaise with the hospital or home tuition service during prolonged absences

• encourage independence in taking responsibility for her own treatment (such as the taking of enzymes with food and pacing herself during PE)

• encourage physical exercise, although the illness can result in energy loss and this must be taken into account during PE and other physical activities.

Spina Bifida
You may need to:

• have regular meetings with parents/carers and professionals as the pupil's needs may change over time

• organise physical access to different parts of the school - particularly toilet and washing facilities

• encourage the pupil to take an active part in playground games as there are many games that do not require a high level of running and jumping

• ensure that appropriately trained adult support is provided

• make use of ICT as an aid to learning and encourage the development of word processing skills

• make use of audio-visual aids

• ensure that extra time is given for specific tasks

• celebrate ability, not disability as some spina bifida sufferers may be very able in a specific area

• provide clearly structured classroom routines to help the pupil with developing his own organisational skills

• use pictorial or colour-coded task lists to support independent planning and organisation of tasks

• break instructions into chunks and check for understanding by asking the learner to repeat each part

• give opportunities for revision of key concepts and vocabulary

• reinforce new concepts through practical activities related to the pupil's own experiences

• use circle time to encourage social interaction and communication skills

• use specific games and activities to develop social communication skills.